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20.04.2020

Why is play important?

 

Children of nursery age learn mostly through play. This is why, when asked about their day at nursery, they will often say “I played!” They don’t realise they are learning!

Play is so important to children and they need to be trusted to play and explore ideas on their own as well as with other adults and siblings. Play is important for them to work out the world around them and make sense of what they see and hear. It is during play that we can see what children know and understand.

 

In Nursery, we take the lead from the children and plan following their interests. We have found that if the children are engaged then they are more likely to learn. This year’s children have been very interested in different animals and this has formed a lot of our learning. We will continue to support their learning with topic ideas however, if this doesn’t interest your child then please adapt it to something more suitable for them. For example, if we suggest retelling the story of Jack and the Beanstalk, and this isn’t a story of interest to your child, then your child could retell another story instead.

Jack and the Beanstalk Activity ideas

Literacy

 

From Monday 20th April there will be a new story time session on the Ruth Miskin YouTube channel on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays suitable for nursery children.

 

Beginning to be aware that stories have a beginning and end

(This can be linked to Jack and Beanstalk)

Read a familiar story. Talk about the characters in the story. Make puppets of the characters.

Read the same familiar story. Talk about the beginning of the story and use the puppets to act out the beginning of the story.

Read the same familiar story. Talk about the end of the story and use the puppets to act out the end of the story.

Read the beginning of the same familiar story. Draw a picture to show what happens at the beginning of the story.

Read the beginning of the same familiar story. Draw a picture to show what happens at the end of the story.

 

Maths

 

Shows an interest in numerals in the environment

Shows an interest in representing numbers

Go on a number hunt in your local area. Look for numbers on doors, the bus stops or cars for example.

Take photos of the numbers they see.

Using the photos from the walk, attempt to mark make some of these numbers. Your child is expected to show an interest in numbers. They do not need to be written accurately and there is no expectation for your child to correctly name any numbers.

Outside you could draw hopscotch squares on the patio. Encourage your child to ‘mark make’ the numbers and then play the game.

OR

If you have skittles or some empty cans you could play skittles and your child could keep score.  

Add sand or anything you have to add texture to paint or PVA glue. Paint out numbers 1-5. Once dry encourage your child to run their finger along each number. Your child may want to have a try at painting their own numbers.

Write large numbers from 1-5 on paper. Children to manipulate playdough to make each number and place on top.

OR place string/ beads/ pasta etc… on top of each number.

 

Log of House Points

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  • Beech 7542
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